Like my brother has said before, “Naming your songs is the best part.” maybe, J

Trade in your baseball cards
For a bat to fight devils
Need a glove to catch shooting stars

Grip the white leather
Dusty leather, in your hands
You’ve got a game to win

There’s dirt in your eyes
From wiping them dry
But it’s good to be blind
When you’re trying to find
Your way home
Run home

"SOW NEW SEED" back  mic track

Some screenshots from HARMLESS CRAFT; a narrative film by Such Handsome Silver.

Now I’m scared for you. The lava is really bad. And there’s a risk that you might die. But I think we’re used to that.
such handsome silver

You Do It For

When we are all settled in our tasks, you come out to sit on the porch. Today you brought a book with you. I noticed because of your way: innocent, genuine, pure. It is like dainty fingers dragging gentling down my back. My lids  are relaxed and a small smile appears. I am excessively soothed. I’m trying to understand more though. I see your bare feet are part of it; your heels pivoted outwards and your toes resting on top of the others. Your book is lying flat in your lap so you are leaning forward with your hands free to twist the stray strands from the bottom of your ponytail. My favorite feature of this performance of sorts is your slightly tilted head; just reading along peacefully. I gathered all of this in moments but I’ll remember for a while. Tomorrow I’ll search for your humbly sanded hair and see if you wouldn’t mind a partner in all this. We’ll just read together and you can teach me to do it right. Then some future can understand the beauty of watching a girl imagine. Even though I’m not a girl, I’ll make sure to emulate the proper affect, you see.

Interior Design and Aisling

There are many franchises in my city. Dairy Queen, Les Schwab, Walmart, blahh blah blah. Each one is a bit different though. I have my favorites. The way the tires create hidden nooks or the particular flicker of florescent lights all help to distinguish the different variations. They are not the same. You can’t even find what you want half as fast as in your home store. (That’s what we’re going to call it. A home store.) There is no reason to feel ashamed of avoiding the bad versions of your stores. Stick to the home version. These places are sickening anyway. Do not settle for the bottom of the barrel of the filth barrel. It would be nice to have a map of each home store. Nothing to fancy. But the aisles must be represented. There is something very special about aisles. I should write a song about them. I love aisles.

In the year 2o81, an over the counter vitamin company created a mild migraine medication. Many years earlier, migraine medication of all kinds was found to be extremely harmful to the brain. The emotional and psychological side effects were found in 100% of takers of the drugs. This new strand was advertised to be without the harmful element. Because the product was admittedly less powerful, consumers were encouraged to take as many as they needed; much like the myth that you cannot overdose on vitamin C. Packaged in two gallon tubs and flavored with BUTTERED CHEEZE, the brain balls were a hit. It was not uncommon for families to break out the drug for a movie snack in place of popcorn. “No headache required to enjoy this treat.” That was printed on every label. Commercials were often themed with a depiction of a nurse massaging an exposed brain. Later, in 2o84, a New Jersey resident named Rick Seth O’gable was arrested for illegal distribution to the Canadian government. Until this, few had been aware that this product was banned in all developed countries, besides the United States. Citizens began to wonder why other nations didn’t want the brain product in their homes. Shockingly, when sought out for questioning, reporters found Mr. O’gable serving life in prison. Apparently the federal prosecutors deemed the product to warrant criminal treatment on the same severity as ecstasy. Many obstacles were placed in the way of any who tried to learn more. Curious pharmaceutical enthusiasts eventually began to analyze the contents of the “snack” independently. They discovered that the drug had a severe side affect that had gone undetected. It affected the nervous system in a way that forced the victim into an artificial state of extreme “insensitivity to pain.” This new development was very enlightening and explained millions of cases in the last three years in which, patients failed to seek medical attention for various illness and physical trauma. They could not feel pain, so if no visible symptoms arose, takers of the drug had no way of knowing that something was wrong. Many theorized that this was a conspiracy designed to prepare Americans for militia battle. Further speculation assumed the governments involvement in a scheme to start a war. Rick Seth O’gable was a retired chemist who was privy to the medical “advantage” and put it to profit and thus was unofficially branded a traitor. Canadians were disappointed to miss out on the chance to mutate. 

In the year 2o81, an over the counter vitamin company created a mild migraine medication. Many years earlier, migraine medication of all kinds was found to be extremely harmful to the brain. The emotional and psychological side effects were found in 100% of takers of the drugs. This new strand was advertised to be without the harmful element. Because the product was admittedly less powerful, consumers were encouraged to take as many as they needed; much like the myth that you cannot overdose on vitamin C. Packaged in two gallon tubs and flavored with BUTTERED CHEEZE, the brain balls were a hit. It was not uncommon for families to break out the drug for a movie snack in place of popcorn. “No headache required to enjoy this treat.” That was printed on every label. Commercials were often themed with a depiction of a nurse massaging an exposed brain. 

Later, in 2o84, a New Jersey resident named Rick Seth O’gable was arrested for illegal distribution to the Canadian government. Until this, few had been aware that this product was banned in all developed countries, besides the United States. Citizens began to wonder why other nations didn’t want the brain product in their homes. Shockingly, when sought out for questioning, reporters found Mr. O’gable serving life in prison. Apparently the federal prosecutors deemed the product to warrant criminal treatment on the same severity as ecstasy. Many obstacles were placed in the way of any who tried to learn more. Curious pharmaceutical enthusiasts eventually began to analyze the contents of the “snack” independently. They discovered that the drug had a severe side affect that had gone undetected. It affected the nervous system in a way that forced the victim into an artificial state of extreme “insensitivity to pain.” This new development was very enlightening and explained millions of cases in the last three years in which, patients failed to seek medical attention for various illness and physical trauma. They could not feel pain, so if no visible symptoms arose, takers of the drug had no way of knowing that something was wrong. Many theorized that this was a conspiracy designed to prepare Americans for militia battle. Further speculation assumed the governments involvement in a scheme to start a war. Rick Seth O’gable was a retired chemist who was privy to the medical “advantage” and put it to profit and thus was unofficially branded a traitor. Canadians were disappointed to miss out on the chance to mutate.